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RISK APPETITE

Genesis can provide comprehensive insurance and reinsurance alternatives to individual public entities, purchasing groups, pools, or trusts. A variety of risk transfer vehicles allow Genesis to meet the needs of entities that are serious about risk management and have the desire and ability to retain risk. 

The School Policy® is a Genesis insurance product developed specifically for K–12 public, private and charter schools. We have tailored The School Policy® to provide comprehensive coverage for the risks schools face every day, including General Liability, Automobile Liability, Employers’ Liability, Law Enforcement Legal Liability, School Board Legal Liability, and Employment Practices Legal Liability

The College and University Policy is an insurance product developed by Genesis specifically for the higher education sector. The policy provides a package of comprehensive coverages tailored to the liability risks facing colleges and universities every day. 

INSIGHTS: THE BLOG

Helping risk managers make the most informed decisions.

What's Next for Qualified Immunity?

Steven Leone

Over the last several weeks, the nation has been focused on the criminal trial and conviction of Derek Chauvin for the tragic death of George Floyd. Since George Floyd’s death nearly a year ago, police reform efforts have advanced with greater urgency. There are increasing calls to regulate the police and to hold them accountable. In years past, qualified immunity may have been an obscure legal doctrine arising in civil lawsuits against government officials. Not anymore. Qualified immunity is in the spotlight. So, what’s next for qualified immunity?

Facial Recognition - Is It Possible to Remain Anonymous?

Steven Leone

Enhanced digital imagery, along with the development of artificial intelligence, has allowed for the increased use of facial recognition technology. However, these advancements have created new legal and ethical questions. Such questions are likely to be areas of rich debate for public entities, policymakers and the public. It makes us wonder if it is possible to remain anonymous in the age of facial recognition?